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Dealing with financial intimidation in a Utah divorce

Without a doubt, emotions tend to run high in a divorce. One spouse may even begin to try to intimidate the other when it comes to finances. Threats that one spouse will be left with nothing and will be homeless after the divorce may be used to instill fear of the divorce process.

Unfortunately, some people are not aware that these threats are often just that -- idle threats. Absent an agreement between the spouse, the court decides what each party receives in a divorce. Having at least a rudimentary understanding of property division laws in Utah could disarm any threats and reduce the stress they cause.

At that point, an individual may better able to discern between what are just threats and what could actually happen. A spouse that says the other spouse will not get a dime may be planning to hide assets or spend everything. If one spouse has reason to believe the other will follow through on threats by hiding assets or overspending, it may be possible to prevent it from occurring by applying for a court order barring certain objectionable conduct.

When it comes to property division and finances in a divorce, some Utah couples may try to intimidate each other. However, being well-informed regarding what the law says will happen -- which is often contrary to the threats being made -- may help to deflect the attempted intimidation. Moreover, divorce does not have to be contentious. It is possible for the parties to get through the process amicably and without unnecessary conflict.

Source: Forbes, How To Cope With Your Husband's Financial Threats During Divorce, Jeff Landers, Jan. 8, 2014

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