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Was Utah man driving under the influence of alcohol?

If a motor vehicle accident occurs on a Utah highway, the drivers and passengers of the vehicles involved must remain at the scene unless, of course, they are being urgently transported to a medical facility because of serious injuries. Attempting to leave the scene of an accident without permission can lead to legal problems. Police say a man who now stands accused of driving under the influence of alcohol tried to flee police moments after he crashed his car.  

The man was not alone in a car that authorities say was traveling at excessive speed when the accident occurred. There was reportedly a female passenger in the car as well. In fact, the woman is said to have spoken to a passerby who stopped to render aid after the collision. She apparently asked if she and her companion could sit inside the good Samaritan's car.  

The crash occurred when the vehicle struck a truck then hit a nearby cement barrier. Thankfully, the driver of the truck was unscathed in the incident. Police say they believe the man who was driving the car and the woman traveling with him were intoxicated when the crash occurred.  

It is one thing, however, for a police officer to make such an assertion and quite another for prosecutors to prove that a motorist was legally intoxicated and driving under the influence of alcohol when he or she wrecked a car. Even if a driver submits to a field sobriety test, it does not constitute guilt in court. Any Utah motorist charged with DUI is guaranteed the opportunity to present as strong a defense as possible to try to avoid conviction.

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