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Dressing like a responsible adult for child custody hearings

Trying to figure out every important aspect of court proceedings can be challenging. Some Utah residents may think that they should put the majority of their focus on the actual laws that could influence their cases, but really, more minor details can also play important parts in a case, such as a person's overall appearance. In particular, parents may want to pay close attention to their appearances during child custody hearings.

Because custody hearings are formal affairs, it is important that parents take the time to dress appropriately. Judges may not look favorably on parents who appear in court wearing cut off jeans, flip-flops or torn t-shirts. This appearance may cause judges to think that the parent is not taking the situation as seriously as he or she should.

Fortunately, individuals can take the time to borrow appropriate clothing or utilize thrift stores for secondhand items that could suit the situation. Often, dark suits or dresses, collared shirts, pants and skirts of a certain length are considered appropriate court attire. Of course, it may be necessary to dress in accommodation with the weather, but in any weather conditions, well-put-together outfits can be created.

Understandably, parents have a considerable amount of information on their minds when dealing with child custody issues, and deciding how to dress may not be a priority. However, their appearances and behavior in court can greatly influence the outcomes of their cases. Utah parents facing this type of situation may wish to discuss courtroom etiquette and other factors with their legal counsel.

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