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Most Utah residents want to lessen stress during divorce

Ending a marriage is a major life change. Unfortunately, this particular change can bring with it stress and tension, especially if the divorce does not go amicably. However, Utah residents can help themselves make it through their cases with less stress and, hopefully, reach agreeable outcomes.

For many people, the stress of divorce comes from the amount of time it takes to finish each part of the process. Individuals may be able to reduce this stress by both accepting that time will need to be put toward completing the divorce and accepting that they can help reduce the amount of time needed. This notion may seem counterintuitive, but there are parts of the process that cannot be sped up, and there are parts that parties can help move along, such as coming to reasonable agreements rather than fighting every suggested settlement.

Financial stress can also stem from divorce, and during this time it is wise to open a new bank account. Most married couples hold joint accounts, but having a solely-owned account in one's name can ensure that he or she has a place for funds and ensure that the other party cannot clear out the account out of spite. It is also wise to explore how joint accounts should be handled.

Divorce can seem intimidating to many Utah residents, and understandably so. A lot goes into ending a marriage, and many people may not fully know what they are getting into. Fortunately, they can speak with experienced family law attorneys in order to gain a reliable perspective on what to expect and how they can help their cases move forward.

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