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Considering retirement security during divorce

Ending a marriage may be the best choice for many people facing unhealthy and unhappy relationships. However, it is no secret that divorce can wreak havoc on finances and future financial plans. In particular, Utah residents' retirement plans could face significant changes due to the impacts of marriage dissolution.

Fortunately, individuals in this type of situation can take steps to help lessen negative impacts on their retirement security. One major action that could benefit such a situation is to understand how state property division laws will affect who gets what. A person may be entitled to a portion of the other party's retirement funds and vice versa. This information could influence how individuals utilize negotiations for property division, especially if they would like to hold on to more of their own retirement funds.

Planning ahead can also help reduce financial strain. Individuals may want to take the time to determine how they could adjust their lifestyles in the future to make saving a priority. It is not always easy due to the financial changes that a divorce can bring, but coming up with a plan ahead of time could allow parties to negotiate for settlement outcomes that could benefit their new lifestyles.

Many people look forward to retirement, and having a reliable nest egg is important. Divorce can easily upend a variety of plans, and Utah residents often do not want to suffer significant financial fallout. Fortunately, individuals can work with their legal counsel to come up with the best plans for protecting retirement funds and other assets.

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