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Changes in affection, communication issues may point to divorce

Many people believe that getting married will the happiest time in their lives. Certainly, this day can bring about much joy for many Utah residents, but some couples may have a hard time keeping that joyous feeling alive over the years. Unfortunately, many details of a relationship could potentially point to possible divorce.

The amount of affection a couple shows could even have an impact on divorce potential. Some individuals may come on strong with affection during the beginning of their relationship and marriage, and during the first couple of years, the intensity of that affection may change. If it changes a considerable amount in the first two years, the couple may be more likely to end their marriage later because their relationship does not seem as committed as it once did.

Communication issues can also be a major red flag that could increase divorce potential. Some people may think they are being clear about their expectations or their feelings when they are not, and as a result, they may feel unheard and hurt when their spouses do not respond accordingly. However, if the communication is not actually clear, spouses may not know what the problems are or how to address them.

Of course, some relationships may be fraught with issues that may include these examples or go far beyond them. In some cases, Utah residents may feel that it would be in the best interests of everyone involved to end their marriages. If so, it is important that those going down this path understand various factors involved with the divorce process, and working with experienced family law attorneys is wise.

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